Supernova Explosions Stay In Shape

G292.0+1.8 & Kepler's Supernova Remnant

These two supernova remnants are part of a new study from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory that shows how the shape of the remnant is connected to the way the progenitor star exploded. In this study, a team of researchers examined the shapes of 17 supernova remnants in both the Milky Way galaxy and a neighbor galaxy, the Large Magellanic Cloud.

The results revealed that one category of supernova explosion, known as "Type Ia," generated a very symmetric, circular remnant. This type of supernova is thought to be caused by a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf, and is often used by astronomers as a "standard candle" for measuring cosmic distances. The image in the right panel, the so-called Kepler supernova remnant, represents this type of supernova.


-K. Arcand, CXC

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