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More Images of N63A
1
Inverted Chandra X-ray Image of N63A
Chandra's image of N63A shows material heated to about ten million degrees Celsius by a shock wave generated by the supernova explosion. This image has been inverted to better show the fluffy crescent-shaped X-ray features that appear around the edge of the remnant. The features are thought to be fragments of high-speed matter shot out from the star when it exploded, like shrapnel from a bomb.
Scale: Image is 112 arcsec per side
(Credit: NASA/CXC/Rutgers/J.Warren et al.)

2
Chandra X-ray Image of N63A
Chandra's image of N63A shows material heated to about ten million degrees Celsius by a shock wave generated by the supernova explosion. The fluffy crescent-shaped X-ray features that appear around the edge of the remnant are thought to be fragments of high-speed matter shot out from the star when it exploded, like shrapnel from a bomb.
Scale: Image is 112 arcsec per side
(Credit: NASA/CXC/Rutgers/J.Warren et al.)

3
Chandra 3-Color X-ray Image of N63A
Chandra's image of N63A shows material heated to about ten million degrees Celsius by a shock wave generated by the supernova explosion. The fluffy crescent-shaped X-ray features that appear around the edge of the remnant are thought to be fragments of high-speed matter shot out from the star when it exploded, like shrapnel from a bomb. The colors red, green and blue in the image correspond to low, medium and high-energy X-rays, respectively.
Scale: Image is 112 arcsec per side
(Credit: NASA/CXC/Rutgers/J.Warren et al.)

4
HST Optical Image of N63A
This visible-light image of supernova remnant N63A was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) on August 10, 1997. The optical light is brightest in the central region of the remnant, which appears as a triangular-shaped "hole" in the X-ray data. The field of view is the same as the Chandra image.
Scale: Image is 112 arcsec per side
(Credit: NASA/STScI/U. Ill/Y.Chu)

5
ATCA Radio Image of N63A
The radio data of supernova remnant N63A was observed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) on May 23, 1991. The radio light is brightest in the central region of the remnant, which appears as a triangular-shaped "hole" in the X-ray data. The field of view is the same as the Chandra image.
Scale: Image is 112 arcsec per side
Credit: ATCA/U. Ill/J.Dickel et al.

6
Chandra, Spitzer, CTIO & Hubble Images of N63a
This color composite combines Spitzer infrared, Chandra X-ray and ground-based H-alpha data in a wide-field view (left panel). The color assignments are: Chandra (all bands) (blue), CTIO ground-based H-alpha (green), Spitzer 4.5 micron (yellow) and Spitzer 8.0 micron (red). On the upper right, X-rays from Chandra reveal new details in N63a. The lower right panel shows a close-up from Hubble of the violent mass of gas and dust in the central region of the supernova remnant.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/CXC/NOAO/AURA/NSF

7
Chandra X-ray Image with Scale Bar
Scale bar = 20 arcsec
(Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Rutgers/J.Warren et al.; Optical: NASA/STScI/U. Ill/Y.Chu; Radio: ATCA/U. Ill/J.Dickel et al.)


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