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More Images of NGC 3576
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North is up
Jpeg, Tif, PS
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Cropped, Rotated
Jpeg, Tif, PS
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IR/Optical Full Field
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Infrared, Optical & X-ray Composite of NGC 3576
Because NGC 3576 is very dense, many of the young, massive stars visible in the Chandra image have previously been hidden from view. A cluster of stars is visible in the infrared data, but not enough young, massive stars have been identified to explain the brightness of the nebula. Astronomers have found a large flow of ionized gas in radio observations and huge bubbles in optical images that extend out from the edge of the HII region. Taken with the X-ray data, this information hints that powerful winds are emerging from this hidden cluster.
(Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Penn State/L.Townsley et al.; Optical: DSS; Infrared: MSX)

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North is up
Jpeg, Tif, PS
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Central Region
Jpeg, Tif, PS

Chandra X-ray Images of NGC 3576
In the Chandra image of this star forming region, lower-energy X-rays (0.5-2.0 keV) are shown in red and higher-energy X-rays (2-8 keV) are in blue. Chandra reveals a cluster of point-like X-ray sources, some of which are massive young stars that are shredding the cloud of gas from which they formed. The blue sources are stars that are deeply embedded in gas. Regions of diffuse X-ray emission are likely caused by hot winds flowing away from the most massive stars.
(Credit: NASA/CXC/Penn State/L.Townsley et al.)

NGC 3576 with Scale Bar

Return to NGC 3576 (27 Sep 06)