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Supernovas & SNR
X-ray Astronomy Field Guide
Supernovas & SNR
Questions and Answers
Supernovas & SNR
Chandra Images
Supernovas & SNR
Animations & Video: Supernovas & Supernova Remnants
Click for high-resolution animation
1. Multi-wavelength Look at 3C58
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*Broadcast Quality

This sequence compares Chandra's X-ray image of 3C58 with the views seen by optical and radio telescopes. The intricate X-ray loops in the Chandra image and the features in the radio images of 3C58 extend a dozen light years from the pulsar, likely representing the complex magnetic field structure there.
[Runtime: 0:32]
(X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/P.Slane et al.; Optical: DSS; Radio: NCSU/S.Reynolds)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
2. SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION (with Dissolve to Cassiopeia A)
QuicktimeMPEG This animation of a supernova explosion dissolves into the Chandra First Light Image, Cassiopeia A.
[Runtime: 0:31]
(Animation: NASA/CXC/D.Berry & A.Hobart)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
3. SUPERNOVA EXPLOSION
QuicktimeMPEG When a massive star explodes, it creates a shell of hot gas that glows brightly in X-rays. These X-rays reveal the dynamics of the explosion.
[Runtime: 0:16]
(Animation: NASA/CXC/A.Hobart)

Click for high-resolution animation
4. SN 1987A Animation
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The animation illustrates the events following the supernova 1987A outburst. The blue ring is previously observed material ejected from the star thousands of years ago. The expanding orange and yellow shell is multimillion degree, X-ray emitting gas produced by the explosion. Portions of the blue ring light up when struck by the X-ray shell.
[Runtime: 0:22]
(Animation: NASA/CXC/D.Berry)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
5. Three Chandra Views of Cassiopeia A
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This sequence shows three different sets Chandra observations of Cassiopeia A. The first image is Chandra's "First Light" image, which was released in August 1999 as the observatory's first major science image. This 5,000-second-long observation then dissolves into another image created from Chandra that contained data from 50,000 seconds of X-ray data released in 2002. Finally, the new one-million-second observation of Cassiopeia A is seen, revealing spectacular new detail and complexity to the supernova remnant.
[Runtime: 0:16]
(NASA/CXC/GSFC/U.Hwang et al.)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
6. Kepler's SNR: Views from Chandra, Hubble & Spitzer
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The composite image of Kepler's Supernova Remnant splits into its three components: blue & green for the Chandra X-ray Observatory, yellow for the Hubble Space Telescope, and red for the Spitzer Space Telescope. Each observatory's full image is then shown side-by-side for comparison, beginning with Chandra, then Hubble, and finally Spitzer.
[Runtime: 0:27]
(NASA/JPL/Caltech/R.Hurt)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
7. Zoom into Kepler's Supernova Remnant
QuicktimeMPEG This zoom-in begins in the Scorpius constellation and pushes through deeper and narrower telescopic fields to reach a composite of images of Kepler's Supernova Remnant, from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer Space Telescope.
[Runtime: 0:21]
(NASA/ESA/STScI)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
8. Best of Chandra Images: Supernovas & Pulsars
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Chandra has provided spectacular examples of the remnants of one of the most dramatic events in the cosmos: supernovas that signal the end of massive stars. This video presents some of the best Chandra observations of supernovas.
[Runtime: 1:05]
(Animation: NASA/CXC/A.Hobart)

Click for high-resolution animation
9. Chandra Timelapse Movie of SN 1987A
QuicktimeMPEG This sequence shows how the X-ray emission from Supernova 1987A (known as SN 1987A) has brightened from 1999 to 2005. The X-rays are produced when a shock wave from the supernova collides with the cooler, outer layers shed before the star exploded. As the shock wave plows deeper into the cool cloud the ring should become larger and much brighter in both optical and X-ray light.
[Runtime: 0:47]
(X-ray Images: NASA/CXC/PSU/S.Park & D.Burrows. Optical Image: NASA/STScI/CfA/P.Challis et al.)

Related Chandra Images:

Click for high-resolution animation
10. Sequence of images of J0617 in IC 443
QuicktimeMPEG Beginning with a wide-field view of the supernova remnant IC 443, this sequence moves into a closer look at the neutron star embedded within known as J0617. The images show these objects in X-rays (blue), radio (green), and optical (red). The location and orientation of J0617's wake are mysterious for astronomers who would have expected it to be aligned toward the center of IC 443.
[Runtime: 0:32]
(Chandra X-ray: NASA/CXC/B.Gaensler et al; ROSAT X-ray: NASA/ROSAT/Asaoka & Aschenbach; Radio Wide: NRC/DRAO/D.Leahy; Radio Detail: NRAO/VLA; Optical: DSS)

Related Chandra Images: