The Chandra X-ray Observatory is now in its ninth year in orbit around the Earth, and things are sometimes lonely out there. So we've been helping Chandra to use the web to reach out to others who like to network online. Here are a few ways to get in touch with Chandra.

The Chandra Podcast: A nice way to learn what's going on in Chandra's universe and to see what it looks like through X-ray eyes. Each month we post a new 4- or 5-minute episode to help people understand what things are like out there in the high-energy Universe. You can watch individual episodes and also subscribe to the podcast here: http://chandra.harvard.edu/resources/podcasts/sd.html

The Beautiful Universe: Chandra's high-definition podcast is a new feature and a way to see Chandra images at their finest. This podcast is meant to be viewed on the big screen: http://chandra.harvard.edu/resources/podcasts/hd/index.html

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Touch the Invisible Sky: This is an audio podcast from the first ever multi-wavelength astronomy book written for the blind, complete with braille images. Each episode is a chapter of this book, read by co-author Simon Steel: http://chandra.harvard.edu/resources/podcasts/braille/index.html

YouTube: You can find Chandra's videos on YouTube. Here's an interview with our staff scientist: http://youtube.com/watch?v=FpdmlhhWNHE or you can just search for X-ray Astronomy at http://youtube.com. Remember, the idea is to get Chandra involved with others, so please give us your feedback by rating the videos you see.

Myspace: Or, you can communicate directly with Chandra by making friends on Myspace. Here's Chandra's page: http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendi...

So there you have it – perhaps the first personal ad ever by a telescope. But, as you can tell, Chandra has a lot to offer, so think about getting in touch.

-April Hobart, CXC


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