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More Images of Crab Nebula
1
A Sequence of Chandra Images
These images are from a sequence of Chandra observations of the Crab Nebula taken from September 2010 through April 2011.
View the motion graphic
(Credit: NASA/CXC/MSFC/M.Weisskopf et al.)
2
Click for large jpg Sep 28 2010 5:21AM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Oct 28 2010 5:58PM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Nov 28 2010 11:17AM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Apr 13 2011 11:32PM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Apr 14 2011 2:32PM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Apr 16 2011 8:45AM
Jpeg, Tif, PS

Click for large jpg Apr 21 2011 11:25PM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Apr 28 2011 6:40AM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Jan 15 2011 12:07AM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Feb 16 2011 4:52PM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Mar 15 2011 6:04AM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Click for large jpg Apr 12 2011 2:15PM
Jpeg, Tif, PS
Chandra X-ray Observations of the Crab Nebula
These images are from a sequence of Chandra observations of the Crab Nebula taken from September 2010 through April 2011. During this period, dramatic variations are seen in the Crab, including the expansion of a ring of X-ray emission around the pulsar (white dot near the center) and changes in the knots within this ring. These variations, however, did not correlate with strong gamma-ray flares seen by the Fermi Gamma Ray Observatory and Italy's AGILE satellite during that period.
View the motion graphic
(Credit: NASA/CXC/MSFC/M.Weisskopf et al)
3
Gamma-ray 'superflare' Images of Crab Nebula
Fermi's LAT discovered a gamma-ray 'superflare' from the Crab Nebula on April 12, 2011. These images show the number of gamma rays with energies greater than 100 million electron volts from a region of the sky centered on the Crab Nebula. Both views eliminate emission form the Crab pulsar by showing the sky in between its pulses. In both images, the bright source below is the Geminga pulsar. At left, the region 20 days before the flare; at right, April 14
(Credit: NASA/DOE/Fermi LAT/R. Buehler)


Return to Crab Nebula (May 11, 2011)